Barbecue

Je Aeng Peanut Satay

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Luke C.

Thailand's food is undoubtedly the most familiar South East Asian cuisine outside the region. This is perhaps one of the reasons that has contributed to misconception that satay, the crowd-pleasing peanut sauce and grilled meat dish, comes from the country. It doesn't - its origins lie in Java where it was probably adapted from kebab recipes brought by Middle Eastern traders.

But Thailand has absorbed the dish as its own since the first satay restaurant opened more than a half a century ago in Bangkok's Chinatown and it's now found on street corners across the land.

Like most street food in Thailand, not all is made equal. Much of Thailand's modern satay is cooked on electric grills which simply doesn't provide the smokey flavour imparted by hot charcoal.

Some of the best satay in the city are cooked up at the tiny Je Aung vendor along the strip of Charoen Krung Road parallel to Yaowarat Road. Here beef, chicken and pork (a notable difference of Thai satay compared to its neighbours) is marinated overnight in coconut milk and curry powder then slapped on red hot charcoal to sizzle until lightly charred.

Of course, the smoky meat is good just as it is, but it's elevated to new levels once used as a mop in the roasted peanut satay sauce that's mild, nutty and spiked with just a hint of chilli. A chilled Thai relish made from cucumber, onion and slices of chilli steeped in white vinegar and palm sugar cuts through the richness of the coconut and peanuts.

There's a scattering of metal tables and stools, though you'd be lucky to pick one up without having to wait. Don't worry, diners don't tend to stay long. This is snacking food, not full meal territory to be lingered over.

Je Aung usually opens at 10am and shuts around 8pm or whenever they sell out, which they often do.Β 

What to order

The most popular here are the chicken and pork, though they also cook beef and pork liver most of which are 70 THB (around US $2.25) for 10 skewers. They also cook whole shell on prawns, a little more expensive but worth the spend. They all come with a complimentary plate of peanut satay and zingy cucumber relish called ajat. For a more filling snack, it's best to order a side of grilled bread for 5 THB which can be used to mob up any surplus peanut satay sauce.

Directions to Je Aeng Peanut Satay

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Cash only
70+ THB
10h00 - 20h00
- closed Monday

Closed Now

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- closed Monday

Closed Now

10h00 - 20h00
- closed Monday

Closed Now

10h00 - 20h00
- closed Monday

Closed Now

10h00 - 20h00
- closed Monday

Closed Now

10h00 - 20h00
- closed Monday

Closed Now

10h00 - 20h00
- closed Monday

Closed Now

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